In 2010, ARTifact opened its doors to 8 students in San Francisco's Cow Hollow neighborhood. ARTifact quickly grew into an enrichment program widely known for its avant-garde and original ART curriculum that fuses Anthropology and ART to help us meet and know our world. As our family of ARTists grew, so did we! In 2016, we opened ARTifact in Corte Madera. Now, the same great curriculum we developed in our San Francisco studio (and our SAME great teachers!) are closer than ever before. Classes are offered to children of all ages 2.5-12.

Over the years, our students have exhibited their work at the deYoung Museum and collaborated with some of the most prolific artists of our time. Our vehicle is ART, but our destination is wherever our ideas take us. Math, science, social studies, history, and literacy are just a few of the core learning principles consistently integrated into our program's ART philosophy. There's also a whole lot of heart and spirit.

 

ARTifact was created for kids and by kids (and those of us who are still kids at heart). We are beyond proud to share a seat at our ART table with each and every one of them. Our teachers are CPR and First Aid Certified, University educated professionals, diverse, talented, and well versed in ARTifact's teaching philosophy. Our kids and teachers are the absolute best of the best. Our community of neighbors near and far are our biggest fans. Together, we've built a great ART family.

 

Whether you're a dreamer, tinkerer, creator, or just someone who likes to get messy, we invite you join us in the creative process. We can't wait to welcome you to our space and share a seat at our table with you!

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PARTIES AND EVENTS

"I can't begin to tell you how much (my daughter) is enjoying her art classes. She is so proud of the work she brings home. I might have mentioned to you already some months ago, in the course of conversation over lunch, (my daughter) informed me that our wood dining table is opaque. What a great little word for her to know at 4 :) What she explained to me today however trumps everything, using big words like sarcophagus, shabti, hieroglyphs, and canopic. She remembered all these words and so much detail of what you have been covering in class. What interesting material and what a fantastic experience you give our children, thank you."

-Parent

"I can't begin to tell you how much (my daughter) is enjoying her art classes. She is so proud of the work she brings home. I might have mentioned to you already some months ago, in the course of conversation over lunch, (my daughter) informed me that our wood dining table is opaque. What a great little word for her to know at 4 :) What she explained to me today however trumps everything, using big words like sarcophagus, shabti, hieroglyphs, and canopic. She remembered all these words and so much detail of what you have been covering in class. What interesting material and what a fantastic experience you give our children, thank you."

-Parent

(Our son) loved his time on Tuesday afternoons. He quickly decided it was the best day of the week and came home with bright eyes, a happy heart and singing himself to sleep. Thank you. It's the first after school activity that he has truly loved and has helped him further explore his passions in art with an entwined bonus of history!

Your teachers are amazing instructors! Full of knowledge, energy, kindness and encouragement. Top notch.

Thank you for creating an amazing art studio and programs for the children. We are the fortunate beneficiaries!

-Parent

Intentional and Authentic ART.

As best we can, we like to honor the integrity of the artists and objects we study. We create our curriculum with the help of those who really own a part of the narrative; through their own eyes and through their own voice. When we share a seat at our ART table, we are also sharing dialogue in a deeply meaningful way.

Dear Lauren,

One thing that my father did in much of his art was to play with the visual shorthands we accept as representations of things.  For example, the squiggles we accept as meaning reflections in a mirror, or different squiggles that we read as the surface of a lake. Why do we so immediately accept these conventions? How can we depict something — an eye, a bowl of fruit, whatever — in as few marks as possible? What’s the minimum we need to recognize a face or a chair? 

Do you think that exercises with this in mind might be fun for the kids?

-Mitchell Lichtenstein (son of Roy Lichtenstein)

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